Artist Call for 2017 Holiday Shop

The 2017 Call for Art is now closed.

Thank you to everyone who applied! If you are interested in applying for future pop-up shops with us, please join our mailing list, and keep an eye on our Facebook page.

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Calling Local Artists and Makers!

We’re looking for talented local artists and craftspeople to feature in our third holiday shop at the Historic Shell Station in Downtown Issaquah: 232 Front St N. If you make great gifty goods we want to feature you!

This holiday shop is curated and run by Alison Lang of So, There (andsothere.com); and will focus on fun, unique, handmade gifts of all sorts. The shop will be open weekends, from Thanksgiving to New Year 2017 in the beautiful, festive Downtown Issaquah corridor.

No table or booth fees! No booth to tend! Chosen products will be sold on consignment, and artists will receive payment (minus commission) for sales following the shop’s closure in December. Artists will be responsible for dropping off stock on November 19-20, and picking it up on January 1-2.

If you make it, we want to see it! We are looking for handmade: packaged food items, fashion accessories, jewelry, pillows, candles, textiles, home accessories, small furniture pieces, journals, stationery, books, office accessories, electronic gadgets, games, children’s toys, and more! Original art pieces will also be considered.


A few more important things

  • Artists must be able to drop off stock on November 19th or 20th, and pick up on January 1st or 2nd.
  • Shop commission is 40% to cover insurance, display, processing fees, and venue. Artist will receive 60% of sales, via check or PayPal by January 30th, 2018.
  • Artists must affix a price tag and business name to each item. Special packaging or tags are welcome.
  • Priority will be given to early applicants and those that are very local to Issaquah.
  • If you have a display or furniture you love to use, and are willing to lend, let us know!

 


Join Us!

Please fill out the form below by October 30th to be considered for the Historic Shell Holiday Shop

Please send a few photos of the products you'd like us to consider. (Max. 2mb)



We should confirm your application within a week. If you don’t hear from us, or have any questions, please email info@andsothere.com.


2016 Featured Artists and Makers

Aline’s Cardboard
Beehive Creations
Britt Greenland
Catshy Crafts
Camp Smartypants
Globetrotting Artist
Glass Elements
Kitten Mittens
Christine Stoll Designs
Lexi Kreutzer
Mayhem Here
Moulton
Mrs. Robinson’s Affair
Orange Twist
Quineli
Rocaille for a Cause
Sarah Bak
Sunday Drive Designs
Scented Gypsy
So There
Uzura
Vye
Wild Born Foods
Yardia
Zoe Beth Jewelry

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A Look at Some Lettering

This post originally appeared on our DIY blog, Adventures-in-Making in 2015.
I think that it’s one of life’s small miracles that no one has to listen to all the noises that go on in my head while I’m working. The cajoling, the reassuring, the brainstorming, the problem solving, the bickering, the promises, the compromises… you get it. It’s noisy, but generally productive (“What were you thinking, Ali?” “You can do it, Ali!”) That’s my process.

Since this month’s craft challenge is all about LETTERS, and so am I, I thought I’d give you a little glimpse into the sketching steps of my lettered pieces.

img_6405I showed you my travel kit of supplies, but my sketches rely on just a few tools. A mechanical pencil, a ruler, a compass, clipboard, lots of erasers, and some thin white card stock.

img_6411I usually have a concept that I’m trying to convey in words. Often it’s one of the mantras I repeat to myself while I’m working (which makes the whole process very meta.) I will write down a bunch of phrases, and think about…
• Priority of words (Visual Hierarchy) – The most important words should generally be biggest and easiest to read to reinforce the message of your piece. I like to think that if you only read the big words, it would be like a summary of the whole statement. As fun as it is to make a really big and elaborate THE, it doesn’t make much sense. (THE message gets hidden.) You can also use visual hierarchy to hide a message and make people really look.
• What shapes I can use in the phrase: Is there a representative shape I can work into the overall form of the lettering? If I’m writing about lemonade, should I make it fit into the shape of a glass?
• What kind of typography would best represent the words? – Some words want to be formal (“Typography”) and some want to be flourishy (“Passionate”). Sometimes it’s fun to mix those up.

I’ll also start looking at the way a word is structured so I’m sure to give it enough space per letter.

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When I have a general idea of the shapes I’d like to play around with, I’ll build myself a make-shift grid with the ruler and compass. I find that I like to make mostly symmetrical pieces, so I’ll map out the middle of the page and go from there. I end up with a lot of extra reference lines, but that’s fine.

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Then I will start very lightly penciling in the skeleton form of letters. I do A LOT of erasing, so light lines are important. Usually while I’m working on the basic structure of the letters, I will start to think about the shape they will take in the end.

img_6421I am constantly working to find the center of a word or phrase. I can count letters in my head, but nothing beats a quick jot down of the phrase. I’ll then count (including spaces) and mark the middle. (This is also helpful because if a word has a lot of skinny letters – like Ilif – it will be much shorter than one with fat letters – MmNn)

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(More penciling.)

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At some point I will inevitably get a “better idea” and shift a bunch of letters to work better. In this case I shifted my grid up, erased and re-lettered.

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Practice makes better.

One of the best consequences of lettering practice is that I’ve started to think of writing as “drawing letters” which makes it sometimes possible to write backwards or sideways. This helps with lots of things including spacing words from the center line (see above). It is also SUPER handy when you’re a lefty who tends to drag your hand through wet ink all the time.

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When I have the skeleton of the letters basically where I want them, I will make decisions about how to flesh them out. My first inspiration was the word “Letter” which reminded me of a typeface I love in my very precious American Wood Type book. (We’ll be showing our favorite lettering books later in the month!)

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I love to keep printed samples of type on hand to look at. I used to try to look at inspiration on a screen, but it never translated right in my brain. I’ve started saving all sorts of printed materials (filed by style) to look at when I’m lettering.

img_6435Again using a light touch, I will start to add details to the letter using my inspiration pieces. Sometimes I make little changes in a letter form to better fit my space (hey, I can do what I want!)

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Sometimes the skeleton of my letters will have to move to allow for more space for some letters

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and sometimes the letters stretch outside of my borders.

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Once I’m happy with the general form of everything, I’ll start erasing the extraneous pencil marks.

IMG_6443Once they are gone, I will sometimes look at the whole thing and decide to make changes.

img_6501Like for instance, I might change the phrase itself.

But that’s okay- it’s just a sketch. If I love it I’ll take it to the next level with paints and ink, and if I don’t love it I’ll put it away to inspire me another day.